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164 pages  

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March 2007  

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Delivery Technologies for Protein Therapeutics Table of Contents

Delivery Technologies for Protein Therapeutics: Assessment and Outlook

Tom Hollon, Ph.D 
 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Chapter 1
INTRODUCTION: TRENDS IN TECHNOLOGY FOR DELIVERING PROTEIN THERAPEUTICS

1.1. Why Better Delivery For Therapeutic Proteins Is Needed
Alternatives to Injection
1.2. Organization of this Report
1.3. Protein Engineering Technologies
1.4. Non-Injection Technologies
1.5. Insulin: El Dorado of Protein Delivery Tech
Multiple Products, Multiple Mechanisms
1.6. Business and Market Outlook
Competition Among Noninjection Technologies
1.7. When Will Tech Trends Merge?

Chapter 2
ENGINEERING THERAPEUTIC PROTEINS FOR LONGER HALF-LIFE

2.1. Introduction
PEGylated Interferons
2.2. Increasing Half-life by PEGylation
Releasable PEGylation
2.3. Increasing Half-life by Site-specific PEGylation
ReCODE Technology
2.4. Increasing Half-life by Conjugation with Polysialic Acid
PolyXen Technology
2.5. Increasing Half-life by Albumin Gene Fusion
2.6. Increasing Half-life by Albumin Conjugation
DAC and PC-DAC Technologies
2.7. Increasing Half-life by Albumin-binding Fatty Acids
2.8. Increasing Half-life by Albumin-binding Peptides
2.9. Increasing Half-life with the Streptococcal Albumin-binding Domain
2.10. Increasing Half-life by Transferrin Gene Fusion
2.11. Increasing Half-life by Hyperglycosylation
2.12 Increasing Half-life by Glycosylation Completion and GlycoPEGylation
2.13. Increasing Half-life by Humanized Glycosylation
2.14. Increasing Half-life by Protease-resistant Point Mutations

Chapter 3
OTHER PROTEIN ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES TO IMPROVE PROTEIN DELIVERY

3.1. Reducing Immunogenicity through Bioinformatics
Epibase Software
3.2. Reducing Protein Aggregation through Bioinformatics
AggreSolve Algorithms
3.3. Refolding Protein Aggregates through High Pressure Technology
PreEMT Technology

Chapter 4
TECHNOLOGIES FOR TRANSDERMAL DELIVERY OF PROTEINS

4.1. Introduction
4.2. Delivery by Radio Frequency (RF) Microelectrode Array
4.3. Active Delivery by Ultrasound
U-Strip Ultrasound Module
4.4. Passive Delivery by Ultrasound
SonoPrep Device
4.5. Delivery by Thermal Burst
PassPort System
4.6. Delivery by Iontophoresis
Actyve Patches
4.7. Delivery by Transfersomes

Chapter 5
Technologies for Oral Delivery of Proteins

5.1. Introduction
5.2. Oral Protein Delivery using Carrier Molecules
Eligen Technology
5.3. Oral Protein Delivery using Crystallization Technology
Crystalomics
5.4. Oral Protein Delivery by Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticles
BioOral System
5.5. Oral Protein Delivery by Buccal Mouth Spray
RapidMist and Oral-lyn
5.6. Oral Protein Delivery using Amphiphilic Oligomers
HIM2 to IN-105

Chapter 6
TECHNOLOGIES FOR PULMONARY AND NASAL DELIVERY OF PROTEINS

6.1. Pulmonary Delivery using Dry Powder Inhalers
Milestone: Exubera
6.2. Other Protein Inhaler Technologies
Competing Products in Clinical Trials
6.3. Pulmonary Delivery using Antibody Transcytosis Fusion Proteins
FcRn Pathway
6.4. Nasal Delivery using Mucosal Absorption Enhancers, Part 1
IntraVail Technology
Pro Tek Excipients
6.5. Nasal Delivery using Mucosal Absorption Enhancers, Part 2
6.6. Nasal Delivery via Tight Junction Modulation

Chapter 7
EXPERT INTERVIEWS

7.1. Abe S. Abuchowski, PhD, CEO, Prolong Pharmaceuticals
7.2. Ajay K. Banga, PhD, Professor and Chair, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Mercer University
7.3. Eric Tomlinson, DSc, PhD, President and CEO, Altea Therapeutics
7.4. Manuel Vega, PhD, CEO Nautilus Biotech

APPENDIX: CHI INSIGHT REPORTS – PROTEIN DRUG DELIVERY SURVEY – DECEMBER 2006

COMPANY INDEX WITH WEB ADDRESSES

REFERENCES